Letters to the Editors Work

Don't forget about this old-school marketing tactic in a social media world.

Even in today’s social media world, the letters to the editor columns are among the best-read sections of any newspaper, whether it is the Smalltown News or USA Today.  It is your link to the public.  But major newspapers get hundreds of letters each week and most run only a few letters a day.

 

 

The rules for getting your letter in the paper or being posted online:

 

  • Be timely.  If your letter is about news that’s three weeks old, nobody cares what you have to say
  • Be brief.  Keep it short, simple and to the point, under 200 words.
  • Have an angle.  Make sure your letter is different than the hundreds of others the newspaper receives.  Have a reason for them to run it.
  • Be sure it is well-written and typed.
  • Try to make reference to something that has been in the newspaper, especially in another letter to the editor.

Where in the World is Anthony?

Worked today in Richmond, VA with the executive team of a global chemical co. Crisis communications tip 46: Positive news stories NOW will protect your organization's reputation during a future crisis. Start building a "reservoir of goodwill." Think of it as a crisis "vaccine"

Gave keynote today in Seattle at a State CIO conference. Communication tip 56: If you find yourself rambling, say outloud, "and my point is..." It will refocus you.

Spent the day in New Jersey working with a fantastic mechanical contractor. Sales Tip 19: Keep Q&A responses 30-45 seconds long. Too long of a response waters down key points. Prioritize!

Spoke at two different events today in Cincinnati. Headed to New Jersey. Team presenting tip 17: Script intentional "interruptions" to reinforce key points and keep people paying attention. It's an artform that will take your presentations to a higher level.

Load More...
Scroll to Top