Keep It Simple

The K.I.S.S. philosophy still reigns king when developing messaging.

I just finished cleaning out some of our files and ran across an ad that was placed in the Wall Street Journal some time ago. I think we all need to be reminded that the K.I.S.S. (Keep it Simple Stupid) Philosophy needs dusting off now and again.  Here’s the copy from the ad.

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Keep It Simple

Strike three.
Get your hand off my knee.
You’re overdrawn.
Your horse won.

 

Yes. No.
You have the account.
Walk.
Don’t walk.
Mom’s dead.

 

Basic events require simple language.

Idiosyncratically euphemistic eccentricities are the promulgators of triturable obfuscation.

What did you do last night? Enter into a meaningful romantic involvement, or fall in love?

What did you have for breakfast this morning?  The upper part of a hog’s hind leg with two oval bodies encased in a shell laid by a female bird, or ham and eggs?

 

David Belasco, the great American theatrical producer, once said: “If you can’t write your idea on the back of my calling card, you don’t have a clear idea.”

Where in the World is Anthony?

Just wrapped my last job of the year. Looking forward to getting off the road for a bit. A sincere thank you to all my clients who made this year feel a bit like old times. Going silent for a few weeks. Happy holidays and God bless everyone!

Working the next two days with an Ohio transit authority. Crisis Tip 51: Emergency response plan and crisis communications plan are NOT the same thing. You need both.

Spent the afternoon in Sacramento moderating a fantastic construction manager's annual meeting. Public Relations tip 2: Want reporters to pay attention to your news release? Write more like a journalist, less like a PR person.

Spoke twice today in Columbus. Worked this morning with a State of Ohio agency, and this afternoon with a construction group. Meeting facilitation tip 5: More Variety = More Energy. Mix things up to keep your audience constantly engaged.

Worked this morning with an Ohio-based insurance company. Crisis communications tip 7: Quickly address misinformation and rumors in the early hours of a crisis, or risk losing control of the narrative.

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